Press

Crucible-web-8


Idea Capital awards $15,000 in grants to Atlanta artists for projects in 2018–January 2018

“Producer and director Corey Bradberry, working with playwright Daniel Glenn, will create But all the other boys are going to the public execution, a dark theatrical comedy set during the bubonic plague.”


Natasha Tretheway: Say It, Say It Again–January 2018

From American Theatre Magazine: “The poet’s haunting ‘Native Guard,’ now a theatre piece at the Alliance, goes to the Civil War and back.”


Theatrical Outfit’s ‘Dancing Handkerchief’ Casts Magic Spell–May 2017

“City Lights” interview w/Lois Reitzes of WABE 90.1FM.


‘Crucible’ actors discuss experiences on set–April 2017

“Corey is a wonderful director,” Lovorn said. “He’s extremely detail-oriented, and without his commitment to such intensive and detailed world building, we wouldn’t have the show we do.”


City of Atlanta Office of Cultural Affairs Announces 2013 Emerging Artist Award Winners

“We are thrilled to have the opportunity to acknowledge this year’s Emerging Artist Award recipients,” said Camille Russell Love, Director of the Office of Cultural Affairs. “It is our hope that this award will help bring much deserved recognition to the recipients, each of whom are making a cultural difference in our city.”


“The Collective Project Sprouts The Devil Tree” by Myke Johns; for WABE, 90.1FM (ATL’s NPR station)–October 2012

“Staged at the Goat Farm, the show takes us into the churches and forests and out-of-the-way corners of the deep south.”


Preview: Collective Project’s Devil Tree Gives Southern Gothic a Fresh Face–October 2012

“It’s almost as if all the people in this county have left pieces around, and the tree sucked them up and grew out of what was left behind.” 


Fear lives next door to ‘The Girl From 2A’–November 2011

“The Collective Project’s sexy, slow-burning psychological thriller will leave you spooked and perplexed.”


Review: Collective Project makes stellar debut with “City of Lions and Gods”–August 2011

“These actors don’t work with elaborate sets, but using music, candles, period books and a few simple props, they create the immersive, unadorned present moments that are the hallmark of live theater. We’ve seen the world premiere of great, smart, original theater in the middle of August during cruddy economic times at a venue called “the Goat Farm.” Stranger things have happened in Atlanta, but rarely.”